State Laws

Delaware and Oregon have joined Massachusetts and other local jurisdictions (like New York City, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh (currently in litigation)) by enacting laws that prohibit employers from inquiring about the salary histories of job applicants. Most of the provisions of Oregon’s Equal Pay Act of 2017 take effect on January 1, 2019, which gives employers time to focus on compliance. Delaware’s ban, however, takes effect on December 1, 2017, so those employers operating in Delaware need to act quickly to change their recruiting and related processes.
(more…)

New York City is the third jurisdiction to pass a ban on salary history inquiries, following Massachusetts and Philadelphia.  Philadelphia’s law was set to take effect in May 2017, however, the constitutionality of Philadelphia’s ban was challenged when the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Philadelphia filed a lawsuit in federal court on April 9, 2017, claiming the ban deprives businesses of their First Amendment rights.  Read our recent article outlining the provisions of Philadelphia’s ban.  New York City’s law will take effect 180 days after the Mayor signs it, which is expected because the Mayor has expressed approval of the ban.
(more…)

Employers in New York must scramble to assess the impact of the new substantial salary level increases that take effect on December 31, 2016. Below is a summary of the new salary levels for exempt administrative and executive employees. The levels are determined by size of employer and where the employer is located in New York. So, for the first time, the salary level required to be exempt from overtime will be different in different parts of the State. (more…)

This year, there are several notable revisions to TN law regarding workers’ compensation. First, reasonable attorney fees and costs can be awarded to the employee and his/her counsel when the employer fails to initiate appropriate medical treatment pursuant to a settlement, expedited order, or judgment and when the employer wrongfully denies a claim and fails to promptly initiate temporary benefits. Therefore, this may greatly limit our ability to deny claims that we had previously denied. As you are aware, very few attorneys wanted to take on cases for employees and this is meant to encourage more attorneys to take claims for employees. (more…)

It seems that with every passing day more cities and states adopt ordinances and statutes governing paid sick leave. At present, three states and eighteen cities have enacted laws providing for paid sick leave. The states are Connecticut, California, and Massachusetts, and the cities are as follows: San Francisco, California; Washington, D.C.; Seattle, Washington; Portland, Oregon; New York, New York; Jersey City, Newark, Passaic, East Orange, Paterson, Irvington, Trenton, Montclair, and Bloomfield in New Jersey; Eugene, Oregon; Oakland, California; Tacoma, Washington; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (more…)