Religious Discrimination

March for Life, et al. v. Sylvia M. Burwell, et al., No. 14-CV-1149 (D.D.C. August 31, 2015) available at https://ecf.dcd.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/show_public_doc?2014cv1149-30

Hobby Lobby took on the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that it must provide female employees certain contraceptives on religious grounds and won. March for Life, a pro-life organization, is trying to reach the same result but on different grounds: It objects to providing certain contraceptives based solely on moral grounds. And it has successfully completed the first leg of its journey. (more…)

On Monday, June 1, the Supreme Court decided a religious discrimination case involving Abercrombie & Fitch and the EEOC. The Court held that “[a]n employer may not make an applicant’s religious practice, confirmed or otherwise, a factor in employment decisions.” The Court also re-affirmed that to succeed on a disparate treatment discrimination claim (i.e., a discrimination claim related to a specific person), one must satisfy the motivating factor standard. The motivating factor standard requires a showing that the protected characteristic (e.g., one’s religion, race, etc.) was a “motivating factor” in the at-issue employment decision. A full copy of the Court’s opinion may be found here. (more…)

Wearable technology or wearable tech is the latest craze in personal electronics. The phrase encompasses anything electronic that is worn by a user. It took center stage at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show, and since then, it has slowly but deliberately moved from fad to mainstream. If Apple’s track record of making products for the masses holds true, wearable tech will continue to take off with the release of the Apple Watch. (more…)